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Do guys need the hpv shot

Human papillomavirus HPV infection remains one of the most commonly sexually transmitted infections in both females and males. HPV viruses are associated with several manifestations including genital warts, but more importantly for urology practitioners, cervical and penile carcinomas and recurrent genital condylomata in both sexes. The incidence of HPV-related carcinomas has increased in cervical, oropharyngeal, vulvar, penile, and anal cancers. Effective vaccines have been available for almost a decade, but widespread adoption of vaccine administration has been problematic for multiple reasons.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Boys & HPV Vaccine

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: HPV Vaccine For Boys

HPV can cause cancers in both genders – so should boys be vaccinated too?

Gardasil vaccine against certain types of HPV responsible for cervical cancer and genital warts. The HPV vaccine is being made available to both boys and girls for the first time in Ireland from September. This is a hugely positive step that will help to prevent HPV-related cancers in men and women and save many lives into the future. The HPV vaccine was first made available to year-old girls in with the purpose of reducing the effects of HPV-related infections, predominately cancerous changes that can happen in the cervix and result in cervical cancer.

It is important to be aware that the human papillomavirus HPV causes cancer in areas beyond the cervix, particularly the anal area, and head and neck cancers. Globally it is estimated that 85 per cent of anal cancers are attributable to HPV infections, and we are now seeing a 20 per cent increase in the incidence of head and neck cancers in Ireland.

Nearly 50 per cent of these cancers are caused by HPV and the majority occur in men. Some 20 countries have now introduced the vaccination for boys, including Australia where the uptake rate is up to 90 per cent. By vaccinating both boys and girls we are creating what is known as herd immunity or reducing the incidence of the HPV infection being passed on to other people across our communities. If only females get the vaccine, then males can still pick up the HPV infection and could infect other people, while being themselves at risk of the associated cancers.

While it is treatable, prevention through vaccination is a huge step forward in eradicating genital warts in the next generation. There is evidence from Australia, which introduced this vaccine a lot earlier than us — for girls and for boys — that rates of cervical cancer are falling and the incidence of genital warts is following the same pattern.

Any opportunity to eradicate cancers — particularly cervical cancer — and reduce the rate of head and neck cancer should absolutely be provided to the next generation. In addition there has been a 77 per cent reduction in HPV types responsible for almost 75 per cent of cervical cancer. The incidence of genital warts in heterosexual men and women under 21 has reduced by 90 per cent and it is hoped that HPV-related cancers, including cervical cancers, will be eradicated in Australia in the coming decades.

Facts show that the side effects from these vaccines are very, very few. The HPV vaccine has been tried and tested to more than million doses and there is no evidence it has had any significant adverse effects. I am a parent, and my advice to any other parent who might be hesitant, is to access reliable information such as the Health Service Executive website hpv. They can give the scientifically-based evidence that HPV vaccines save lives. There are very few vaccines that actually prevent cancer and this is one of them.

They put themselves out there at a time of great personal suffering to push this agenda with Minister for Health Simon Harris and so many others because they knew its importance. They shared their personal stories of living with HPV-related illnesses, showing us the strength of the human voice in advocating for prevention through vaccination.

We are grateful for their efforts and hope that through public health initiatives such as gender-neutral vaccination that these cancers will become less common.

The Irish public could have been alerted sooner to the merits of basic masks. Mary Horgan. Facts show that the side effects from these vaccines are very, very few Nearly 50 per cent of these cancers are caused by HPV and the majority occur in men. More from The Irish Times Opinion.

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Pros, cons, and ethics of HPV vaccine in teens—Why such controversy?

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Back to Medication. It goes on to say that, "Government advisers are to consider whether the HPV vaccine, routinely offered to girls at the ages of 12 and 13 since to help protect them against cervical cancer, should also be offered to boys and some men".

If you have questions or need to talk, call our helpline for information or support. Come to a support event to meet other people who have had a cervical cancer diagnosis. Face to face support for people living with or beyond a cervical cancer diagnosis. Read about ways to cope with any effects of treatment and getting practical support.

Who Should Get the HPV Vaccination and Why

E arlier this year, the biotech community mourned the loss of Michael Becker , a former pharmaceutical industry executive who turned his cancer into a teaching moment. In , we watched on his blog as cancer drugs failed him, as he became hale and hearty as he stopped chemo, and then as the cancer returned. The tumors invaded his bones, so he needed a cane. In July, his cancer killed him. The data also underline one of the very lessons he tried to drive home : A vaccine that is still largely seen as one for girls and women needs to be offered to boys and maybe men, too. Of those, 20, are women and 14, are men. In men, the most common HPV-caused cancer is the one Becker had: cancer of the mouth and throat. There are an estimated 13, cases of HPV oropharynx cancer each year. Of these, 11, are in men.

HPV Vaccine Approved for Women and Men up to Age 45

Protect your child from developing certain types of cancers later in life with the HPV vaccine at ages 11— Two doses of the HPV vaccine are recommended for all boys and girls at ages 11—12 ; the vaccine can be given as early as age 9. Children who start the vaccine series on or after their 15th birthday need three shots given over 6 months. Vaccines protect your child before they are exposed to a disease. HPV vaccination is also recommended for everyone through age 26 years, if not vaccinated already.

Human papillomaviruses are DNA viruses that infect skin or mucosal cells. In the genital tract HPV especially types 6 and 11 cause genital warts, the commonest viral sexually transmitted disease.

If you could give your child a vaccine to prevent cancer, would you? Seems like a no-brainer, right? And yet, although such a vaccine does in fact exist, only 49 percent of girls and 37 percent of boys have received it in the U. And last summer, Scotland and England extended their vaccination programs to include boys.

Data Protection Choices

HPV stands for human papillomavirus. In fact, about 14 million people, including teens, become infected with HPV every year. When that happens, some types of HPV can cause genital warts, while other types can lead to cancer.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Can I Still Get HPV Vaccine if I’m Older?

Gardasil vaccine against certain types of HPV responsible for cervical cancer and genital warts. The HPV vaccine is being made available to both boys and girls for the first time in Ireland from September. This is a hugely positive step that will help to prevent HPV-related cancers in men and women and save many lives into the future. The HPV vaccine was first made available to year-old girls in with the purpose of reducing the effects of HPV-related infections, predominately cancerous changes that can happen in the cervix and result in cervical cancer. It is important to be aware that the human papillomavirus HPV causes cancer in areas beyond the cervix, particularly the anal area, and head and neck cancers. Globally it is estimated that 85 per cent of anal cancers are attributable to HPV infections, and we are now seeing a 20 per cent increase in the incidence of head and neck cancers in Ireland.

Healthy Balance

You might have questions, such as how the vaccine works, the possible side effects — and curiously, why boys are exempted when they can be carriers of the HPV. Eight out of 10 people will get an HPV infection at some point in their lifetime without knowing it. In most cases, HPV goes away on its own. This is called herd immunity. What does this mean for parents then? The vaccine comprises an empty protein coat that tricks the body into thinking that it has been exposed to HPV infection, said Dr Ismail-Pratt, who explained that the vaccine does not contain any viral DNA in it. The human papillomavirus.

Urologists need to remain aware of the prevention strategies for HPV infection estimated HPV vaccination coverage among adolescent boys and girls aged  by MD White - ‎ - ‎Cited by 28 - ‎Related articles.

The CDC recommends catch-up HPV vaccination for adults through age 26 who have not been vaccinated before, or who have not completed the vaccination series. Getting the vaccine matters because HPV can lead to vulvar, vaginal, and cervical cancer in women, and anal cancer and genital warts in men and women:. For most people, HPV clears on its own. Infection with one type of HPV does not prevent infection with another type.

Pros, cons, and ethics of HPV vaccine in teens—Why such controversy?

Who needs the HPV vaccine? How many doses? What about side effects?

New evidence shows why the HPV vaccine is as important for boys as girls

Most people clear the virus without ever knowing they have it. It is when it persists in the cells that some types of HPV can, usually over decades, cause cancer. As with any vaccine, the HPV vaccine may not fully protect everyone who is vaccinated and does not protect against all HPV types. The vaccine cannot help clear HPV infection that is already in your cells.

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Comments: 3
  1. Sajar

    Allow to help you?

  2. Nikazahn

    It is very a pity to me, I can help nothing, but it is assured, that to you will help to find the correct decision.

  3. Taurr

    Rather valuable piece

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