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How much sleep do we need to function optimally

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The objective of this narrative review paper is to discuss about sleep duration needed across the lifespan. Sleep duration varies widely across the lifespan and shows an inverse relationship with age. Sleep duration recommendations issued by public health authorities are important for surveillance and help to inform the population of interventions, policies, and healthy sleep behaviors. However, the ideal amount of sleep required each night can vary between different individuals due to genetic factors and other reasons, and it is important to adapt our recommendations on a case-by-case basis.

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Sleeping hours: what is the ideal number and how does age impact this?

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Optimizing sleep is something I have been obsessed with for the past 15 years. In when I was the peak of my career as a high flying attorney, life threw a curveball at me in the form of a call from my doctor who informed me that on the basis of some blood tests he had run, it was clear I had a month to live.

I had developed two life threatening autoimmune conditions on the basis of being unwittingly exposed to 3 toxic chemicals.

I saw several specialists afterwards who all confirmed the original diagnosis but said I could stay alive if I lived on a cocktail of drugs that had at least 25 possible side effects including Osteoporosis and Diabetes. One of the things I was repeatedly told is that I would need at least 10 hours sleep every day in order to function. In those days, I was probably typical of many lawyers, burning the candle at both ends, drinking strong coffee into the early hours while preparing for a trial, eating badly and not getting enough exercise.

I was tired all the time. I knew that had to change but there was no way I could spend ten hours in bed every day. I still had big plans and a life to get on with. That was the moment my obsession with optimizing performance and sleep began. Through continuous experimentation over the past 15 years, and a lot of money spent, I have managed to hack and optimize my sleep so that I can perform optimally on 6.

Had I not developed the 2 autoimmune conditions, I would almost certainly need less sleep. My own experiences and that of some of my clients initially caused me to question the 8 hour myth but it is only in recent years that I have come across the scientific evidence that supports and explains these experiences. The power of belief has long been recognized in the sphere of health and medicine through the placebo effect. Numerous studies have shown that self-reported sleep longer than 7.

From a different standpoint, Dr. Quantity matters. Some people may always need 8 hours sleep e. Some people may need 8 hours after a heavy day. Sleep is essential and wonderful. But so is being awake. Why sleep more than you need to when you have a life to live? Sleep quality is on the decrease and this inevitably means many people awake unrestored and go through their days feeling tired all of the time.

This is largely a condition of the modern day Western lifestyle. Advances in sleep science, technology and a select few truly game changing wearables, enable us to understand our specific sleep need, how much REM and deep sleep we achieved, our sleep latency, the number of disruptions as well as the impact of. The insights provided by research and a few key wearables enable us to know how to sleep better, to modify our behaviors and create the conditions for optimal sleep.

Over and above nutrition and exercise, Optimal sleep is the most powerful weapon you have at your disposal to dramatically improve your physical, mental and emotional health as well as increase your performance and productivity.

Your privacy is protected. Your contact information is secure. I will never share, rent or sell it. You will only receive our videos and newsletters, once a week when you subscribe. The Reality Optimizing sleep is something I have been obsessed with for the past 15 years.

I had developed two life threatening autoimmune conditions on the basis of being unwittingly exposed to 3 toxic chemicals I saw several specialists afterwards who all confirmed the original diagnosis but said I could stay alive if I lived on a cocktail of drugs that had at least 25 possible side effects including Osteoporosis and Diabetes. Different people have differing sleep needs influenced by a number of variables including, genetics, age, health status, lifestyle including but not limited to diet and exercise and sleep quality.

Perception and belief can impact how you feel. People who sleep five or six hours may be reassured. Quality is Critical Sleep quality is on the decrease and this inevitably means many people awake unrestored and go through their days feeling tired all of the time.

Advances in sleep science, technology and a select few truly game changing wearables, enable us to understand our specific sleep need, how much REM and deep sleep we achieved, our sleep latency, the number of disruptions as well as the impact of The time you go to bed Environment Food types and timing of meals Alcohol Caffeine Exercise Light Bed and bedroom companions The insights provided by research and a few key wearables enable us to know how to sleep better, to modify our behaviors and create the conditions for optimal sleep.

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Sleep Needs

Most adults need 7 to 8 hours of good quality sleep on a regular schedule each night. Make changes to your routine if you can't find enough time to sleep. This helps you naturally get sleepy at night and stay alert during the day. If you have to work at night and sleep during the day, you may have trouble getting enough sleep.

This guide will walk you through everything you need to know if you want to get better sleep. Plain and simple, the purpose of this guide is to explain the science of how to sleep better. You can click the links below to jump to a particular section or simply scroll down to read everything.

With plenty of work to do or dinner meetings to attend, some people just inadvertently push themselves to the limit, completely overlooking the utterly undesirable effects of sleep deprivation: tired eyes and clouded thinking, among many others. For you to be able to function properly either at work or in school, you need to make it a habit to get a good dose of Zzzs. However, the question is, how much sleep do we really need in order for our brains to function optimally? Here are the answers according to experts.

Why Seven Hours of Sleep Might Be Better Than Eight

Using sleep data from its wearable devices, Fitbit researchers compared them to users' scores on Think Fast, an app Fitbit offers on its smartwatches. They found that people who slept an average of 5 hours and 50 minutes to 6 hours and 30 minutes per night performed better on the test than people who slept more or less. These amounts are shorter than what doctors typically advise. Public health officials and physicians have long recommended adults sleep for at least seven hours, if not more, each night. They've become increasingly vocal about this as people work longer hours and spend more time in front of screens before bed. Fitbit research scientist Jonathan Charlesworth said these guidelines are based on how much time people spend in bed as opposed to how much time people actually sleep. However, he said even Fitbit's numbers are just averages, and the numbers can vary per person, especially based on factors like age and gender. Still, the ideal number Fitbit found reflects time people spent actually sleeping.

Evolving Wellness

The question of how much we need to or should sleep is one that has plagued many of us on numerous occasions. This is also an area of health and science that has been vigorously studied and explored by scientists over the past few decades. While some people believe we need a full eight hours each night, others have hinted that much less is optimal and yet others have even warned us of the dangers of over sleeping. When addressing the facts behind the quantity of sleep, we must first start with the right question. It is a matter of life and death, or for most of us a matter of quality of health.

The quality of your sleep directly affects your mental and physical health and the quality of your waking life, including your productivity, emotional balance, brain and heart health, immune system, creativity, vitality, and even your weight. No other activity delivers so many benefits with so little effort!

Sleep is a vital indicator of overall health and well-being. Sleep needs vary across ages and are especially impacted by lifestyle and health. The National Sleep Foundation released the results of a world-class study that took more than two years of research to complete — an update to our most-cited guidelines on how much sleep you really need at each age.

How Much Sleep Do We Really Need In Order for Our Brains to Function Optimally?

Experts say that most adults need between 7 and 9 hours of sleep every night. However, they also say that individual sleep needs vary, sometimes widely. This leaves many of us with a lot of questions. Many things factor in when determining how much sleep you need.

But how much sleep do we really need? Until about 15 years ago, one common theory was that if you slept at least four or five hours a night, your cognitive performance remained intact; your body simply adapted to less sleep. But that idea was based on studies in which researchers sent sleepy subjects home during the day — where they may have sneaked in naps and downed coffee. Enter David Dinges, the head of the Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory at the Hospital at University of Pennsylvania, who has the distinction of depriving more people of sleep than perhaps anyone in the world. In what was the longest sleep-restriction study of its kind, Dinges and his lead author, Hans Van Dongen, assigned dozens of subjects to three different groups for their study: some slept four hours, others six hours and others, for the lucky control group, eight hours — for two weeks in the lab. During the P.

Sleeping hours: what is the ideal number and how does age impact this?

Optimizing sleep is something I have been obsessed with for the past 15 years. In when I was the peak of my career as a high flying attorney, life threw a curveball at me in the form of a call from my doctor who informed me that on the basis of some blood tests he had run, it was clear I had a month to live. I had developed two life threatening autoimmune conditions on the basis of being unwittingly exposed to 3 toxic chemicals. I saw several specialists afterwards who all confirmed the original diagnosis but said I could stay alive if I lived on a cocktail of drugs that had at least 25 possible side effects including Osteoporosis and Diabetes. One of the things I was repeatedly told is that I would need at least 10 hours sleep every day in order to function. In those days, I was probably typical of many lawyers, burning the candle at both ends, drinking strong coffee into the early hours while preparing for a trial, eating badly and not getting enough exercise. I was tired all the time. I knew that had to change but there was no way I could spend ten hours in bed every day.

Nov 27, - Beyond sleep quantity, other important sleep characteristics should be Guidelines on the recommended amount of sleep needed for optimal health exist; sleep among adults may include but not be limited to work demands, social As the relationship between long sleep duration and increased risk of  by JP Chaput - ‎ - ‎Cited by 14 - ‎Related articles.

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The Science of Sleep: A Brief Guide on How to Sleep Better Every Night

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